News from Barbara our Resident Marine Biologist.
Oceans are the true heart of our planet Earth. They regulate our climate, they reduce the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere, the phytoplankton in them produces between fifty to seventy per cent of the oxygen we breathe (!!!) – and most likely life itself derives from the deep blue waters. 
Everything in the ocean is linked to everything else and the resulting complex ecosystems even scientists will sometimes find difficult to understand. And just like with the “butterfly effect”, even slight changes  within an ecosystem may negatively affect many functions within this network and may even impact larger ecosystems throughout the entire ocean. 
One example for such an ecosystem are the coral reefs, the so-called rain forests of the sea. Although coral reefs cover less than one per cent of the ocean floor, they are home to about a quarter of all marine species. This makes them highly valuable for the marine life, but also for us humans – for food and medicine as well as for recreation. 
In cooperation with IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Reethi Beach is currently developing and implementing a Marine Managed Area around the island – a concept to be replicated throughout the country in order to increase the overall expanse of protected areas. For this we need to monitor the entire reef and identify zones which require special protection. Certain areas will then be marked as off-limits to allow baby corals to settle down undisturbed and broken corals to recover. 
To gain an insight into the development of the health of the reef, our Resident Marine Biologist Barbara has already installed sedimentation traps to measure and monitor changes among the coral colonies.Additional signage and information by the snorkel entries as well as an environmental information booklet currently in production are aimed at increasing awareness among guests and colleagues. 
Unfortunately much of the coral cover around the island is still severely damaged by ill-informed snorkelers and swimmers.

The entire Reethi Beach team is already involved in training sessions about marine matters and is continuously encouraged to treat the environment in a respectful way.

News from Barbara our Resident Marine Biologist.

Oceans are the true heart of our planet Earth. They regulate our climate, they reduce the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere, the phytoplankton in them produces between fifty to seventy per cent of the oxygen we breathe (!!!) – and most likely life itself derives from the deep blue waters. 

Everything in the ocean is linked to everything else and the resulting complex ecosystems even scientists will sometimes find difficult to understand. And just like with the “butterfly effect”, even slight changes  within an ecosystem may negatively affect many functions within this network and may even impact larger ecosystems throughout the entire ocean. 

One example for such an ecosystem are the coral reefs, the so-called rain forests of the sea. Although coral reefs cover less than one per cent of the ocean floor, they are home to about a quarter of all marine species. This makes them highly valuable for the marine life, but also for us humans – for food and medicine as well as for recreation. 

In cooperation with IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Reethi Beach is currently developing and implementing a Marine Managed Area around the island – a concept to be replicated throughout the country in order to increase the overall expanse of protected areas. For this we need to monitor the entire reef and identify zones which require special protection. Certain areas will then be marked as off-limits to allow baby corals to settle down undisturbed and broken corals to recover. 

To gain an insight into the development of the health of the reef, our Resident Marine Biologist Barbara has already installed sedimentation traps to measure and monitor changes among the coral colonies.Additional signage and information by the snorkel entries as well as an environmental information booklet currently in production are aimed at increasing awareness among guests and colleagues. 

Unfortunately much of the coral cover around the island is still severely damaged by ill-informed snorkelers and swimmers.

The entire Reethi Beach team is already involved in training sessions about marine matters and is continuously encouraged to treat the environment in a respectful way.

This Sunday, June 8th, it’s World Oceans Day! People around our blue planet celebrate and honor the ocean, which links us all. Be a part of this growing global celebration! SeaExplorer Dive Centre Reethi Beach Resort organises the turtle experience:An evening presentation by the resident marine biologist, followed by an excursion to the local turtle reef (Fonimagoodhoo Island). The latter will raise funds for the resort’s own environmental and social fund for the support of local islands in order to reduce their environmental impact. 
=> http://worldoceansday.org/events/the-turtle-experience/Can’t attend Reethi’s World Oceans Day event? You can take some of these easy pledges for this year:-Fix, reuse and donate instead of tossing “trash”.-Think before you buy-Do I need this? Is there too much packaging?-Get and use a reusable bottle.-Use reusable shopping bags.
 
This Sunday, June 8th, it’s World Oceans Day! People around our blue planet celebrate and honor the ocean, which links us all. Be a part of this growing global celebration! 

SeaExplorer Dive Centre Reethi Beach Resort organises the turtle experience:
An evening presentation by the resident marine biologist, followed by an excursion to the local turtle reef (Fonimagoodhoo Island). The latter will raise funds for the resort’s own environmental and social fund for the support of local islands in order to reduce their environmental impact. 
=> http://worldoceansday.org/events/the-turtle-experience/

Can’t attend Reethi’s World Oceans Day event? You can take some of these easy pledges for this year:
-Fix, reuse and donate instead of tossing “trash”.
-Think before you buy-Do I need this? Is there too much packaging?
-Get and use a reusable bottle.
-Use reusable shopping bags.

 

NEWSFLASH: It’s time for a CELEBRATION!!! TripAdvisor has awarded Reethi Beach Resort with a 2014 Certificate of Excellence !!! 

NEWSFLASH: It’s time for a CELEBRATION!!! TripAdvisor has awarded Reethi Beach Resort with a 2014 Certificate of Excellence !!! 

TWEET Of The Week: @reethibeachres “Thought I’d share this stunning photograph I took when arriving at the island!” ~Victoria Bailey Thanks Victoria for sharing this gorgeous picture with us! Follow us on Twitter: ==>https://twitter.com/reethibeachres

TWEET Of The Week: @reethibeachres “Thought I’d share this stunning photograph I took when arriving at the island!” ~Victoria Bailey Thanks Victoria for sharing this gorgeous picture with us

Follow us on Twitter: ==>https://twitter.com/reethibeachres

MANTA SEASON has started! Yesterday we had 4 Mantas at Donfan Thila (one of the top dive spots) circling above the divers for the entire length of the dive (60 minutes that is)!

MANTA SEASON has started! Yesterday we had 4 Mantas at Donfan Thila (one of the top dive spots) circling above the divers for the entire length of the dive (60 minutes that is)!

We wanted to share with you the turtle pictures from the free action on our beach on May 1st !

News from Barbara, our Resident Marine Biologist. Rescued baby turtles set freeDid you know marine turtles remember the place where they were born? Female turtles return back to the beach where they hatched after traveling thousands of miles across the ocean. Turtles remember the location through detecting the earths magnetic fields. It was an emotional experience watching the baby turtles (known as “hatchlings”) making their way to the water in Reethi Beach. Everything on the beach was an obstacle - but this gauntlet is important for memorizing the location of the beach. Turtle specialists say only one out of a thousand will survive to adulthood under natural conditions.After an adult female sea turtle lays eggs on the beach, she returns to the sea, leaving her nest to develop on their own. It takes about 40-50 days until the babies hatch, whereas their gender is determined by the temperature of the sand. The developing hatchlings do not have sex chromosomes so their gender is determined by the temperature within the nest. At optimal temperatures ranging between approximately 28-29 degress celsius, the embryos develop into a mix of males and females. Temperatures above this range produce females and colder temperatures produce males.We hope to share more beautiful experiences like this and are proud of our staff who rescued the turtles from another island. Well done!Barbara 

News from Barbara, our Resident Marine Biologist. 

Rescued baby turtles set free
Did you know marine turtles remember the place where they were born? Female turtles return back to the beach where they hatched after traveling thousands of miles across the ocean. Turtles remember the location through detecting the earths magnetic fields. 

It was an emotional experience watching the baby turtles (known as “hatchlings”) making their way to the water in Reethi Beach. Everything on the beach was an obstacle - but this gauntlet is important for memorizing the location of the beach. Turtle specialists say only one out of a thousand will survive to adulthood under natural conditions.

After an adult female sea turtle lays eggs on the beach, she returns to the sea, leaving her nest to develop on their own. It takes about 40-50 days until the babies hatch, whereas their gender is determined by the temperature of the sand. The developing hatchlings do not have sex chromosomes so their gender is determined by the temperature within the nest. At optimal temperatures ranging between approximately 28-29 degress celsius, the embryos develop into a mix of males and females. Temperatures above this range produce females and colder temperatures produce males.

We hope to share more beautiful experiences like this and are proud of our staff who rescued the turtles from another island. Well done!

Barbara 

TWEET Of The Week: @reethibeachres “It was so nice! Thanks”! ~ Daniel Roesch. That’s fantastic to hear Daniel and thanks for sharing this stunning pic with us!! 
Follow us on Twitter: ==>https://twitter.com/reethibeachres 

TWEET Of The Week: @reethibeachres “It was so nice! Thanks”! ~ Daniel Roesch. That’s fantastic to hear Daniel and thanks for sharing this stunning pic with us!! 

Follow us on Twitter: ==>https://twitter.com/reethibeachres 

Hereby we wanted to give a BIG thanks to all our guests who have lend us a hand in cleaning and planting trees on the uninhabited island Hirundhoo for Earth Day 2014!!

News from Barbara our Resident Marine Biologist: 
Hanifaru Bay clean up
How do you clean up a Biosphere Reserve for manta rays? Yesterday around 60 people from five resorts including Reethi Beach together with Biosphere Rangers and local island councils met to make it happen: We cleaned up our pressures Hanifaru Bay, a part of the first Biosphere Reserve in Maldives. Hanifaru Bay is world-famous for a unique event that is about to happen soon: in June and July hundreds of manta rays gather in the area to feed on plankton that occurs in high quantities during this season. Usually we can spot the Reef Manta (Manta alfredi) in Maldives, one out of so far two identified manta ray species. Reef Mantas are slightly smaller (about 5 m fin width) and are easily recognizable by their black pattern between the gill slits on the belly side. Did you know manta rays do not have a sting? Most people believe they are dangerous animals but they are very calm and harmless animals and neither possess weapons, nor teeth.
Barbara

News from Barbara our Resident Marine Biologist: 

Hanifaru Bay clean up

How do you clean up a Biosphere Reserve for manta rays? Yesterday around 60 people from five resorts including Reethi Beach together with Biosphere Rangers and local island councils met to make it happen: We cleaned up our pressures Hanifaru Bay, a part of the first Biosphere Reserve in Maldives. Hanifaru Bay is world-famous for a unique event that is about to happen soon: in June and July hundreds of manta rays gather in the area to feed on plankton that occurs in high quantities during this season. Usually we can spot the Reef Manta (Manta alfredi) in Maldives, one out of so far two identified manta ray species. Reef Mantas are slightly smaller (about 5 m fin width) and are easily recognizable by their black pattern between the gill slits on the belly side. 
Did you know manta rays do not have a sting? Most people believe they are dangerous animals but they are very calm and harmless animals and neither possess weapons, nor teeth.


Barbara